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Psalm 8:9: The Excellency Of The Lord: “O LORD our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth!”


SIH TOTT ICONINTRODUCTION TO OUR SERIES:

Psalm 8 is a wonderful Psalm that was written by King David with the central purpose of praising the Lord for his greatness as revealed to us in nature. By God’s grace alone, with hearts filled with reverence and awe, we will be seeing our Lord in all His glory as we look at nature around us.

As a result of seeing God’s greatness, we will also be reminded of man’s insignificance, and God’s great grace which grants to this insignificant man great honor and glory. May we all come to a greater understanding of His greatness, our insufficiency, and His great grace as we enter into this devotional series.

Lord willing, this devotional series (including this introduction) will be 10 lessons in length and will be looking at one verse per devotion.

TODAY’S TEXT:

Psa 8:1-9

(1) To the chief Musician upon Gittith, A Psalm of David. O LORD our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth! who hast set thy glory above the heavens.

(2) Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast thou ordained strength because of thine enemies, that thou mightest still the enemy and the avenger.

(3) When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained;

(4) What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?

(5) For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.

(6) Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet:

(7) All sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field;

(8) The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.

(9) O LORD our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth!

TODAY’S DEVOTIONAL:

O LORD our Lord,

In this Psalm, David reminds us of some very important truths:

  1. “who hast set thy glory above the heavens” – His glory is displayed in the daytime and nighttime skies.
  2. “Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast thou ordained strength because of thine enemies, that thou mightest still the enemy and the avenger.” – He uses the small and seemingly insignificant to bring honor to Himself and defeat His most powerful enemies.
  3. “When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained;” – The skies reveal His glory and His sovereignty as His plans from eternity past are brought to partial completion with the creation of the heavens.
  4. “What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?” – Based upon the Lord’s greatness, we must ask ourselves why He thinks about and makes the effort to intervene in our lives.
  5. “For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.” – Above thinking about man and intervening in his life, the Lord also created man in an exalted position of authority over, and respect from, God’s creation.
  6. “Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet:” – God gave mankind the great threefold responsibility over nature: to rule over, to use, and to care for nature
  7. “All sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field;” – Man’s authority over nature includes all earthly animal life.
  8. “The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.” – Man’s authority also extended to all air and water life.

As we think on these things they establish the truth that the our God is Lord over all. He possesses Kingly rule; He is merciful and gracious; He is All powerful and wise; and finally, His glory can be seen in every areas of nature, which is His creation.

Based upon all of these truths, we can come to the certain conclusion that ….

how excellent is thy name in all the earth!

The Lord’s name (a reflection of His person and works) is “glorious”, “beautiful” and “worthy”. What David as just told us about the Lord proves it.

 

 

PRACTICAL APPLICATION:

When we started this study our desire was to recognize and meditate upon the greatness of our wonderful Lord, and then give Him praise for His greatness in our thoughts, words, and actions.

King David has certainly given us all the information we need to praise and honor our Lord throughout our lifetime! May we all praise Him throughout the rest of our lives!

This brings an end to our verse-by verse study of Psalm 8… but wait… there’s more. Not only does this Psalm bring us face to face with many of the wonderful glories of our Lord, but it also gives us three basic truths about Christ presented to us in this Psalm.

In the next three parts of our study, we will be looking at these truths about Christ as they were written by King David!

 

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Psalm 8:6: The Excellency Of The Lord: “Thou Hast Put All Things Under His Feet”


SIH TOTT ICONINTRODUCTION TO OUR SERIES:

Psalm 8 is a wonderful Psalm that was written by King David with the central purpose of praising the Lord for his greatness as revealed to us in nature. By God’s grace alone, with hearts filled with reverence and awe, we will be seeing our Lord in all His glory as we look at nature around us.

As a result of seeing God’s greatness, we will also be reminded of man’s insignificance, and God’s great grace which grants to this insignificant man great honor and glory. May we all come to a greater understanding of His greatness, our insufficiency, and His great grace as we enter into this devotional series.

Lord willing, this devotional series (including this introduction) will be 10 lessons in length and will be looking at one verse per devotion.

TODAY’S TEXT:

Psa 8:1-9

(1) To the chief Musician upon Gittith, A Psalm of David. O LORD our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth! who hast set thy glory above the heavens.

(2) Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast thou ordained strength because of thine enemies, that thou mightest still the enemy and the avenger.

(3) When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained;

(4) What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?

(5) For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.

(6) Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet:

(7) All sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field;

(8) The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.

(9) O LORD our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth!

TODAY’S DEVOTIONAL:

King David continues to describe mankind’s position that they held prior to the fall…

 

Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands;

The Lord gave to man authority to control and to rule over the Lord’s creation. This includes both ruling over, caring for, and using the Lord’s creation for mankind’s benefit. This is clearly brought out in Genesis 1:26-28…

“And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them.

And God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth.”

 

Please note the three-fold responsibility (and opportunity) that man was given over nature:

  1. He was to rule over (control) nature… “let them have dominion over” (vs 26); “and have dominion” (vs 28). In other words, bring it under man’s control.
  2. He was to use nature for his benefit… “and subdue it” (vs 28) in other words, to control for man’s use and profit.
  3. He was to care for it and not abuse it… “replenish the earth” (vs 28) in other words, cause nature to flourish, cause it to propagate.

 

thou hast put all things under his feet:

At creation, mankind was given a perfect type of ruler ship over God’s creation. Nature was his to use, not to abuse; nature was his to sustain him, not deplete him; nature was his to benefit him, not harm him; nature was his to aid him, not hinder him. This was mankind’s intended relationship to nature.

 

PRACTICAL APPLICATION:

This is the type of rulership over nature for which mankind was originally created. Sadly, this perfect type of rule was lost in the fall of mankind…

Man no longer possess a perfect type of dominion over nature. Now, many times, nature depletes man; it harms him, and hinders him… all of this is taking place while mankind is abusing nature and wastefully depleting it to satisfy his own selfish lusts. These are all results of mankind’s choice to rebel against the Lord in the Garden of Eden.

After the Lord gave to mankind the blessing of exaltation over His creation, mankind responded by choosing to rebel against Him. In spite of mankind’s rebellion against Him, the Lord still has chosen to look down to mankind, showing them mercy and personally intervening in their lives. In doing so, He gives to them the understanding of their need to repent and grants them faith in Him.

What a wonderful Lord we serve!

 

Homepage… http://www.settledinheaven.org

Text Blog… http://www.settledinheaven.wordpress.com

Video Blog… http://www.youtube.com/settledinheaven

Email… settledinheaven@gmail.com


Psalm 8:4: The Excellency Of The Lord: “What is Man?”


SIH TOTT ICONINTRODUCTION TO OUR SERIES:

Psalm 8 is a wonderful Psalm that was written by King David with the central purpose of praising the Lord for his greatness as revealed to us in nature. By God’s grace alone, with hearts filled with reverence and awe, we will be seeing our Lord in all His glory as we look at nature around us.

As a result of seeing God’s greatness, we will also be reminded of man’s insignificance, and God’s great grace which grants to this insignificant man great honor and glory. May we all come to a greater understanding of His greatness, our insufficiency, and His great grace as we enter into this devotional series.

Lord willing, this devotional series (including this introduction) will be 10 lessons in length and will be looking at one verse per devotion.

TODAY’S TEXT:

Psa 8:1-9

(1) To the chief Musician upon Gittith, A Psalm of David. O LORD our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth! who hast set thy glory above the heavens.

(2) Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast thou ordained strength because of thine enemies, that thou mightest still the enemy and the avenger.

(3) When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained;

(4) What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?

(5) For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.

(6) Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet:

(7) All sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field;

(8) The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.

(9) O LORD our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth!

TODAY’S DEVOTIONAL:

 

What is man, that thou art mindful of him?

King David, when he thinks about the greatness of His Lord, is reminded of man’s inability, sinfulness, and irrelevance.

This leads him to ask His God, “Why do you remember man and give place in your thoughts to him? Man is sinful, disobedient, impotent, and of no spiritual value apart from you.” In this question David is emphasizing the THOUGHTS of the Lord.

But King David does not stop there, he then asks the Lord another question to emphasize his point…

 

and the son of man, that thou visitest him?

“Lord, why do you go to, and care for those who are born of human, fallen, sinful parents?”

Here, David is not speaking of the Lord’s thoughts but of His ACTIONS towards sinful man. The Lord not only places His thoughts upon man, but He also actively goes to man and lovingly intervenes in his life.

 

PRACTICAL APPLICATION:

Folks, these are two very important questions that we all need to be considering. Why does the Lord think about us, seek us, and then graciously intervene in our lives? After considering the Lord’s greatness, David came to understand the Lord does these things not based upon anything in us.

We do not deserve His gracious intervention nor can we merit it through any good works we might do. He intervenes in our lives only because He mercifully chooses to do so. May we all praise and honor the Lord this day for His wondrous thoughts and actions that He has shown towards us!

 

Rom 3:23-28 –

“For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God; Being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus: Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation through faith in his blood, to declare his righteousness for the remission of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God; To declare, I say, at this time his righteousness: that he might be just, and the justifier of him which believeth in Jesus. Where is boasting then? It is excluded. By what law? of works? Nay: but by the law of faith. Therefore we conclude that a man is justified by faith without the deeds of the law.’

 

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Video Blog… http://www.youtube.com/settledinheaven

Email… settledinheaven@gmail.com


Psalm 8:3: The Excellency Of The Lord: “when I consider Thy heavens”


SIH TOTT ICONINTRODUCTION TO OUR SERIES:

Psalm 8 is a wonderful Psalm that was written by King David with the central purpose of praising the Lord for his greatness as revealed to us in nature. By God’s grace alone, with hearts filled with reverence and awe, we will be seeing our Lord in all His glory as we look at nature around us.

As a result of seeing God’s greatness, we will also be reminded of man’s insignificance, and God’s great grace which grants to this insignificant man great honor and glory. May we all come to a greater understanding of His greatness, our insufficiency, and His great grace as we enter into this devotional series.

Lord willing, this devotional series (including this introduction) will be 10 lessons in length and will be looking at one verse per devotion.

TODAY’S TEXT:

Psa 8:1-9

(1) To the chief Musician upon Gittith, A Psalm of David. O LORD our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth! who hast set thy glory above the heavens.

(2) Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast thou ordained strength because of thine enemies, that thou mightest still the enemy and the avenger.

(3) When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained;

(4) What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?

(5) For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.

(6) Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet:

(7) All sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field;

(8) The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.

(9) O LORD our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth!

 

TODAY’S DEVOTIONAL:

“When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers,

King David’s mind turns to the vast glories of the heavens. As he views and reflects upon the heavens, he remembers that they were all created by his God. As David thought on these things, he was reminded of the Lord’s glory, power, and His deity.

 

Psa 19:1

“To the chief Musician, A Psalm of David. The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament sheweth his handywork.”

 

Rom 1:20

“For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse:”

 

the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained;”

King David draws our attention to the lights found in the night sky… the moon and the stars. David emphasizes that the Lord is the One that “ordained” (established, founded, arranged) them. This helps us to see that, not only did the Lord create them, but He did so based upon His plans and counsels from eternity past.

 

PRACTICAL APPLICATION:

Folks, in this verse, David reminds us of the great glory of our Lord as it is revealed to us in the skies. Simply by looking at the skies we can see the Jesus’s glory, power, deity, wisdom and lordship over all.

As we progress through our day, may we all remember the wondrous glory of the Lord and understand the preeminent place of the Lord in our lives and the world as a whole. May we dedicate our lives to Him and live for Him from this point forward, knowing that the heavens reveal His great glory and honor to all those that gaze upon them.

Homepage… http://www.settledinheaven.org

Text Blog… http://www.settledinheaven.wordpress.com

Video Blog… http://www.youtube.com/settledinheaven

Email… settledinheaven@gmail.com

 

 


Psalm 8:1: The Excellency Of The Lord: “how excellent is thy name in all the earth!”


SIH TOTT ICONINTRODUCTION TO OUR SERIES:

 

Psalm 8 is a wonderful Psalm that was written by King David with the central purpose of praising the Lord for his greatness as revealed to us in nature. By God’s grace alone, with hearts filled with reverence and awe, we will be seeing our Lord in all His glory as we look at nature around us.

As a result of seeing God’s greatness, we will also be reminded of man’s insignificance, and God’s great grace which grants to this insignificant man great honor and glory. May we all come to a greater understanding of His greatness, our insufficiency, and His great grace as we enter into this devotional series.

Lord willing, this devotional series (including this introduction) will be 10 lessons in length and will be looking at one verse per devotion.

TODAY’S TEXT:

Psa 8:1-9

(1) To the chief Musician upon Gittith, A Psalm of David. O LORD our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth! who hast set thy glory above the heavens.

(2) Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast thou ordained strength because of thine enemies, that thou mightest still the enemy and the avenger.

(3) When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained;

(4) What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?

(5) For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.

(6) Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet:

(7) All sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field;

(8) The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.

(9) O LORD our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth!

TODAY’S DEVOTIONAL:

 

“O LORD our Lord,

In the opening phrase of this Psalm, King David uses two different Hebrew titles to address the Most High God… “LORD” and “Lord”:

  1. The title “LORD” is translated from the Hebrew word for Jehovah, the personal name for our God. It speaks of God as the self-existent One, pointing to His strength, eternal existence, and self-sufficiency. In other words, the Lord’s existence is not reliant upon anyone or anything. Because He is all-powerful He is self-existent, He can exist in and of Himself alone, His eternal existence proves this.
  2. The title “Lord” is translated from the Hebrew word for master, controller, or owner. It describes our God as the Ruler of our lives and the Controller of all the events that take place in this world.

how excellent is thy name in all the earth!

The Lord’s “name” is mentioned by King David. Please keep in mind our name is a title that describes us. “Father”, “Mother”, “Son”, “Daughter”, “Accountant”, “Pastor”, “Rich”, “Poor” are all titles that teach others much about us. These are our names.

The meaning of “excellent” can be best described by the words “glorious”, “beautiful” and “worthy”. When we stop and think about the titles of our God, “Lord”, “Creator”, “Sovereign”, “Alpha and Omega” etc etc. we see they teach us much about the wondrous nature and workings of our Lord. This is why all the titles of God are “excellent”.

However, in the context, King David is describing the title of “LORD” as the excellent title held by the Lord. When we read that The Lord is the self-existent One, it heaps glory upon Him, it makes Him look beautiful, and it proclaims to all of us His great worth.

Truly how excellent is the name of the LORD in all the earth! No other one can rightfully hold this title or be described as “self-existing One”.

who hast set thy glory above the heavens.”

King David now gives us and illustration of the greatness of the LORD…

Simply look up at the skies and see all the glories it contains. In the daytime, notice the wonderfully bright sun that enlightens the world. Look at the miracles of the birds who can soar and fly for seemingly hours on end. See the puffy white clouds that paint our sky with relaxing beauty.

And then at night, look at the details of the stars and planets that are hung there. Be amazed by the displays of the Northern lights, a meteor shower, or the full moon that dimly enlightens the earth.

And, finally, realize that His glory far exceeds all the glories of this atmosphere and the outer space above it. This is how glorious and wondrous our Lord is, when we see Him as His names reveal Him to us.

 

PRACTICAL APPLICATION:

Folks, today, let us all stop and think about the many names of our wonderful LORD, dwell on His greatness and then praise Him for it…

Psa 148:11-14 –

“Kings of the earth, and all people; princes, and all judges of the earth: Both young men, and maidens; old men, and children: Let them praise the name of the LORD: for his name alone is excellent; his glory is above the earth and heaven. He also exalteth the horn of his people, the praise of all his saints; even of the children of Israel, a people near unto him. Praise ye the LORD.”

 

Homepage… http://www.settledinheaven.org

Text Blog… http://www.settledinheaven.wordpress.com

Video Blog… http://www.youtube.com/settledinheaven

Email… settledinheaven@gmail.com

 

 


Psalm 8:1-9: The Excellency Of The Lord: Introduction


SIH TOTT ICONINTRODUCTION TO OUR SERIES:

Psalm 8 is a wonderful Psalm that was written by King David with the central purpose of praising the Lord for his greatness as revealed to us in nature. By God’s grace alone, with hearts filled with reverence and awe, we will be seeing our Lord in all His glory as we look at nature around us.

 

As a result of seeing God’s greatness, we will also be reminded of man’s insignificance, and God’s great grace which grants to this insignificant man great honor and glory. May we all come to a greater understanding of His greatness, our insufficiency, and His great grace as we enter into this devotional series.

 

Lord willing, this devotional series (including this introduction) will be 10 lessons in length and will be looking at one verse per devotion.

TODAY’S TEXT:

 

Psa 8:1-9

(1) To the chief Musician upon Gittith, A Psalm of David. O LORD our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth! who hast set thy glory above the heavens.

(2) Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast thou ordained strength because of thine enemies, that thou mightest still the enemy and the avenger.

(3) When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained;

(4) What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?

(5) For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.

(6) Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet:

(7) All sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field;

(8) The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.

(9) O LORD our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth!

TODAY’S DEVOTIONAL:

 

“To the chief Musician upon Gittith, A Psalm of David.”

Although this opening introductory sentence is not a part of the inspired Scriptures, we can learn a bit about Psalm 8…

 

First of all, we see that David wrote this Psalm to be sung during times of worship. This is why he gave it to “the chief Musician”.

 

Secondly, we can also learn that this Psalm was meant to be used “upon Gittith”. A first glance, this may seem to be describing some Jewish feast or celebration upon which this Psalm was meant to be sung. However, according to most scholars, “Gittith” does not speak of a celebration at all, but instead it speaks of the type of musical instrument, or tune that was to be used in the singing of this Psalm.

Please notice that the root word of “Gittith” literally means “a Gittite” or “an inhabitant of Gath”. Gath was a city located in Philistia, the land of the Philistines. Keep in mind, David spent time living with the Philistines and could easily be acquainted with the musical instruments and tunes that they played. This instrument, or tune, is probably to what the term “Gittith” refers.

 

Finally, the author of this Psalm is identified as King David. Although most scholars have no idea when this Psalm was written, its contents seems to be based upon David’s remembrances of his days as a shepherd boy, living among nature, viewing the wonders of the night sky as he laid down to sleep and viewing the greatness of this earth and its inhabitants during the daylight hours as he watched his father’s sheep.

 

PRACTICAL APPLICATION:

Folks, how often do we take the time to stop and simply worship and praise at the Lord “in the beauty of His holiness” (1 Chr 16:29, 2 Chr 20:21)? Now is our “big chance” to do just that!

By God’s grace let us all take a moment before we begin each devotional lesson to rid our mind of the temporal, earthly concerns that we face, and prepare to see the Lord in all His glory.

I am seeking His enabling grace to present a very dim view of His greatness to all of us in this short series from Psalm 8. Truly without Him I can do nothing, but through Him I can do all things.

May He bless all of us as we seek to come before Him, and bow down, and kneel before our Lord our Maker…

 

Psa 95:6-9 – “O come, let us worship and bow down: let us kneel before the LORD our maker. For he is our God; and we are the people of his pasture, and the sheep of his hand. To day if ye will hear his voice, Harden not your heart, as in the provocation, and as in the day of temptation in the wilderness: When your fathers tempted me, proved me, and saw my work.“

 

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Text Blog… http://www.settledinheaven.wordpress.com

Video Blog… http://www.youtube.com/settledinheaven

Email… settledinheaven@gmail.com

 

 

 


Philippians 4:2-3 “those women which laboured with me in the gospel”


 

 

INTRODUCTION TO OUR SERIES:

Background to Philippians…

The Apostle Paul wrote the epistle (personal letter) (1:1) to the Philippian church, probably during his imprisonment in Rome. The letter was written from a heart of love and concern for the Philippians. Due to Paul’s imprisonment, he could not personally visit with the church so he sent this letter with Timothy to encourage them and bring back news of their condition to Paul. (2:19).

Some of the main divisions of the book include:

1. Introduction to the book: 1:1-2

2. Paul’s thankfulness for the Philippians: 1:3-11

3. News of Paul’s imprisonment and dedication: 1:12-26

4. Following Christ’s example is our duty: 1:27-2:18

5. Paul’s representatives and the need to treat them kindly: 2:19-30

6. Paul’s example of living a joyous life: 3:1-11

7. The Christian’s heavenly calling: 3:12-21

8. The need for Godly living: 4:1-9

9. The love offerings of the Philippians: 4:10-20

10. Closing to the book of Philippians: 4:21-23

 

 

TODAY’S TEXT:

Php 4:2-3 – I beseech Euodias, and beseech Syntyche, that they be of the same mind in the Lord. And I intreat thee also, true yokefellow, help those women which laboured with me in the gospel, with Clement also, and with other my fellowlabourers, whose names are in the book of life.

 

TODAY’S DEVOTIONAL:

I beseech Euodias, and beseech Syntyche,

Paul now “beseech (es)” the females that have labored with him in times past. To beseech simply means to call to oneside. Paul is inviting these ladies to join him by….

 

that they be of the same mind in the Lord.

…being in agreement in mind, desires, and knowledge of the truths of God. This will eliminate any disagreements and areas of friction between themselves as they serve the Lord.

Rom 15:5 – “Now the God of patience and consolation grant you to be likeminded one toward another according to Christ Jesus:”

Paul understood that many times Satan will use divisions and doctrinal error to hinder the work of Christ.

Rom 16:17-18 – “Now I beseech you, brethren, mark them which cause divisions and offences contrary to the doctrine which ye have learned; and avoid them. For they that are such serve not our Lord Jesus Christ, but their own belly; and by good words and fair speeches deceive the hearts of the simple.”

 

Paul knew that Christians who stand firm in their faith and unifed as one will avoid many of these downfalls.

And I intreat thee also, true yokefellow, help those women which laboured with me in the gospel, with Clement also, and with other my fellowlabourers,

The idea of a “true yokefellow” involves one who was a sincere servant of Christ working side by side with Paul.

By “true yokefellow” Paul is probably addressing Epaphroditus or another faithful man who had joined him on his journeys (Timothy, Silas etc). Paul instructs him to help meet the needs of these women who had so faithfully served the Lord by his side. Note in this instance Paul seems to be placing this “yokefellow” in a more submissive role by helping meet the needs of the women as they served the Lord (not vice versa).

Paul goes on to list others who had been useful to his ministry while he was in Philippi. Clement is mentioned along with others who had worked side by side with Paul.

 

 

whose names are in the book of life.

Paul reminds his “yokefellow” that those he is sent to help are all spiritual brothers and sisters. As such, they shared many attributes with this yokefellow… their salvation experience; their Lord; their need to share Christ with others; their eternal blessings and homeland; etc etc. All of these help to cultivate a unity in service between the yokefellow and those he is sent to help.

 

 

 

PRACTICAL APPLICATION:

There are several basic lessons we can learn from this portion of Scripture…

 

1. The importance of unity in mind, desires, goals, and doctrines, to effectively serve the Lord as one unit.

2. The need to appreciate and properly value the women who labor among us for the cause of Christ.

3. The proper attitude of humility, willing to step in and meet the needs of those who are serving Christ, no matter what their gender, position in the church, or age.

4. Those who labor with us are our spiritual brothers and sisters, and as such, share much in common with each of us including our eternal home.

May we all seek to follow the teachings of our Lord, given through the Apostle Paul, to be more effective servants for Him.

Questions, Comments, or Suggestions?

Email me at: rob.barkman@settledinheaven.org

Homepage… http://www.settledinheaven.org

Text Blog… http://www.settledinheaven.wordpress.com

Video Blog… http://www.youtube.com/settledinheaven


Philippians 4:1 “Stand Fast In The Lord”


 

INTRODUCTION TO OUR SERIES:

Background to Philippians…

The Apostle Paul wrote the epistle (personal letter) (1:1) to the Philippian church, probably during his imprisonment in Rome. The letter was written from a heart of love and concern for the Philippians. Due to Paul’s imprisonment, he could not personally visit with the church so he sent this letter with Timothy to encourage them and bring back news of their condition to Paul. (2:19).

Some of the main divisions of the book include:

1. Introduction to the book: 1:1-2

2. Paul’s thankfulness for the Philippians: 1:3-11

3. News of Paul’s imprisonment and dedication: 1:12-26

4. Following Christ’s example is our duty: 1:27-2:18

5. Paul’s representatives and the need to treat them kindly: 2:19-30

6. Paul’s example of living a joyous life: 3:1-11

7. The Christian’s heavenly calling: 3:12-21

8. The need for Godly living: 4:1-9

9. The love offerings of the Philippians: 4:10-20

10. Closing to the book of Philippians: 4:21-23

 

 

TODAY’S TEXT:

Php 4:1 – “Therefore, my brethren dearly beloved and longed for, my joy and crown, so stand fast in the Lord, my dearly beloved.”

 

TODAY’S DEVOTIONAL:

Therefore,

The word “therefore” refers us back to Paul’s previous teachings on the many blessings awaiting the believer at the second coming of Christ (3:20-21). He will be using these eternal blessings that await God’s people as a motivating force to encourage them to “stand fast in the Lord”…

 

 

my brethren dearly beloved and longed for, my joy and crown,

 

As Paul addresses the believers in the church at Philippi, he describes them as:

1. my brethren – Paul and the Philippian believers were members of the same spiritual family.

2. dearly beloved – Paul loved them with a sacrificial love

3. longed for – Paul missed them and sincerely desired to be with them

4. my joy – They brought delight to Paul as he heard about them and thought about them

5. crown – Paul’s was rewarded for his faithfulness by hearing and seeing their obedience and service to Christ.

All of these titles show us that Paul loved and appreciated his dear Philippian friends. This helps to remind us that Paul was encouraging the Philippians from a heart of love only desiring the best for them.

 

 

 

so stand fast in the Lord, my dearly beloved.”

 

Paul encourages the believers to persevere in their service to Christ in the face of continuing opposition and danger. By remaining faithful they would probably face even greater hardships as their persecution would probably increase.

Why would Paul, one who loved them dearly, encourage them to take actions that would only increase their sufferings? It was because Paul understood that greater benefits lie in the spiritual blessings of obedience to Christ, then the temporal blessing of lesser opposition through compromise with the lost world.

 

Their faithfulness was a very important issue with Paul. He greatly desired to see them stand firm in their service to Christ in the midst of the persecutions they faced. This was so important to Paul that he had previously emphasized the need for continued faithfulness to them…

Php 1:27 – “Only let your conversation be as it becometh the gospel of Christ: that whether I come and see you, or else be absent, I may hear of your affairs, that ye stand fast in one spirit, with one mind striving together for the faith of the gospel;”

 

PRACTICAL APPLICATION:

Folks, are we continuing faithful in the face of the many trials and issues of life that take place? Keep in mind, not only does our faithfulness reap eternal rewards for us, but it also encourages other believers around us. All believers are members of the family of God, and as a family, our actions affect others in our family. We are not islands to ourselves whose actions only affect ourselves.

 

Tit 2:7-8 – “In all things shewing thyself a pattern of good works: in doctrine shewing uncorruptness, gravity, sincerity, Sound speech, that cannot be condemned; that he that is of the contrary part may be ashamed, having no evil thing to say of you.”

 

 

Questions, Comments, or Suggestions?

Email me at: rob.barkman@settledinheaven.org

Homepage… http://www.settledinheaven.org

Text Blog… http://www.settledinheaven.wordpress.com

Video Blog… http://www.youtube.com/settledinheaven


Philippians 3:17-19 “Ye Have Us for an Ensample”


INTRODUCTION TO OUR SERIES:

Background to Philippians…

The Apostle Paul wrote the epistle (personal letter) (1:1) to the Philippian church, probably during his imprisonment in Rome. The letter was written from a heart of love and concern for the Philippians. Due to Paul’s imprisonment, he could not personally visit with the church so he sent this letter with Timothy to encourage them and bring back news of their condition to Paul. (2:19).

Some of the main divisions of the book include:

1. Introduction to the book: 1:1-2

2. Paul’s thankfulness for the Philippians: 1:3-11

3. News of Paul’s imprisonment and dedication: 1:12-26

4. Following Christ’s example is our duty: 1:27-2:18

5. Paul’s representatives and the need to treat them kindly: 2:19-30

6. Paul’s example of living a joyous life: 3:1-11

7. The Christian’s heavenly calling: 3:12-21

8. The need for Godly living: 4:1-9

9. The love offerings of the Philippians: 4:10-20

10. Closing to the book of Philippians: 4:21-23

 

 

TODAY’S TEXT:

 

Php 3:17-19 – “Brethren, be followers together of me, and mark them which walk so as ye have us for an ensample. (For many walk, of whom I have told you often, and now tell you even weeping, that they are the enemies of the cross of Christ: Whose end is destruction, whose God is their belly, and whose glory is in their shame, who mind earthly things.)”

 

TODAY’S DEVOTIONAL:

Brethren, be followers together of me, and mark them which walk so as ye have us for an ensample.

 

Paul encourages the brethren to be “co-imitators” of himself. He goes on to tell them to take note of those who follow Paul’s example. These are the people that the brethren are to follow.

Why would Paul encourage the brethren to follow him, instead of telling them to follow Christ?

1. Paul understood our human nature. It is far easier to follow an example we can see with our eyes as compared to attempting to follow an example based on the historical account of someone’s life. At this point in time in history Christ was no longer present on the earth and the Word of God was not completed yet. For people to learn about, and follow, Christ they would have to hear about His life from a first or second hand source.

2. In the context, Paul is telling them to follow His example because he was following Christ. In essence, by following Paul’s example they would be following Christ.

3. Also keep in mind the context of the passage. Paul had just explained his great desire to be willing to put sin to death in his life and live a life of sacrifice for Christ. He had just encouraged others to do so as well (vs 11-16).

He may have been referring to this aspect of his life only. In other words, he was telling the people of Philippi to follow the example he was setting by desiring to put sin away and give their all in the service of Christ. This would involve following Christ’s example in all things.

In any case, Paul’s encouragement for others to follow his example does no injustice to the importance of being followers of Christ.

 

 

(For many walk, of whom I have told you often, and now tell you even weeping, that they are the enemies of the cross of Christ:

 

Paul understood the need for the brethren to carefully choose whom they would emulate. There were many who came in the name of Christ, claiming to be His servants, who were actually opposed to His cause.

 

They were a sorrow to the heart of Paul. He understood their lost condition and the great harm they caused to the work of Christ.

 

 

 

Whose end is destruction, whose God is their belly, and whose glory is in their shame, who mind earthly things.)”

Those who actively oppose the work of Christ under the guise of service to Him are described by Paul as:

1. Whose end is destruction, – eternal ruin, constant entering into a worse state forever

2. whose God is their belly, – they worship and serve their fleshly appetites

3. and whose glory is in their shame, – the earthly honor and following they achieve will result in eternal embarrassment

4. who mind earthly things. – they place their attention and affection on the things this world has to offer.

PRACTICAL APPLICATION:

WOW! What a blessing it would be if we knew we lived such a Godly life that we would encourage others to be followers of us! If we carefully examine ourselves, I doubt if many of us (myself included) would feel comfortable do so.

This shows us such a need for Godly living on each of our parts! May we all follow the command of our Lord given to us by the Apostle Paul who said….

1Ti 4:12 – “Let no man despise thy youth; but be thou an example of the believers, in word, in conversation, in charity, in spirit, in faith, in purity.”

Questions, Comments, or Suggestions?

Email me at: rob.barkman@settledinheaven.org

Homepage… http://www.settledinheaven.org

Text Blog… http://www.settledinheaven.wordpress.com

Video Blog… <a href="http://www.youtube.com/settledinheaven


Philippians 3:8-11 “That I Might Win Christ”


INTRODUCTION TO OUR SERIES:

Background to Philippians…

The Apostle Paul wrote the epistle (personal letter) (1:1) to the Philippian church, probably during his imprisonment in Rome. The letter was written from a heart of love and concern for the Philippians. Due to Paul’s imprisonment, he could not personally visit with the church so he sent this letter with Timothy to encourage them and bring back news of their condition to Paul. (2:19).

Some of the main divisions of the book include:

1. Introduction to the book: 1:1-2

2. Paul’s thankfulness for the Philippians: 1:3-11

3. News of Paul’s imprisonment and dedication: 1:12-26

4. Following Christ’s example is our duty: 1:27-2:18

5. Paul’s representatives and the need to treat them kindly: 2:19-30

6. Paul’s example of living a joyous life: 3:1-11

7. The Christian’s heavenly calling: 3:12-21

8. The need for Godly living: 4:1-9

9. The love offerings of the Philippians: 4:10-20

10. Closing to the book of Philippians: 4:21-23

 

 

TODAY’S TEXT:

 

Php 3:8-11 – “Yea doubtless, and I count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord: for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and do count them but dung, that I may win Christ, And be found in him, not having mine own righteousness, which is of the law, but that which is through the faith of Christ, the righteousness which is of God by faith: That I may know him, and the power of his resurrection, and the fellowship of his sufferings, being made conformable unto his death; If by any means I might attain unto the resurrection of the dead.”

 

TODAY’S DEVOTIONAL:

Yea doubtless, and I count all things but loss

Paul had no doubt in his mind that all his personal attributes and what he had previously accomplished (vs 5-6) were simply a detriment and obstruction to obtaining…

 

 

for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord:

 

the highest possible achievement in life… to obtain a personal knowledge of Christ as Savior and Lord of his life.

 

 

for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and do count them but dung,

 

This same knowledge of Christ caused Paul to give up all his previous accolades and accomplishments; he was seeing them as simply refuse that is to be cast away.

 

 

Paul changed his attitudes and priorities of life so that…

 

 

that I may win Christ,

 

1. he might enter into a personal relationship with Christ and enjoy intimacy with Him.

 

 

 

And be found in him, not having mine own righteousness, which is of the law, but that which is through the faith of Christ, the righteousness which is of God by faith:

 

2. he might, through faith be the recipient of Christ’s righteousness. He needed the righteousness of Christ because, being a part of fallen mankind, he had no righteousness of his own.

Please note that Christ’s righteousness is described in two ways:

a. “through the faith of Christ” – this righteousness is received through faith that comes from, and is brought to completion by, Christ (Hebs 12:2).

b. “of God by faith” – this righteousness originates with God through an exercise of faith in Christ (Roms 3:22).

 

 

That I may know him, and the power of his resurrection, and the fellowship of his sufferings, being made conformable unto his death;

Having an intimate relationship with Christ results in the Christian:

a. “may know Him” – a personal relationship with Christ

b. “may know the power of His resurrection” – the receipt of eternal life, and being dead to sin and alive to service of Christ.

c. “may know the fellowship of his sufferings” – suffering and self-sacrifice for the cause of Christ.

All of these make the Christian formed in the mold of Christ’s death. This causes the Christian to die to sin and be willing to live a life of sacrifice for Him (Roms 6:5-6; 2 Cor 4:11).

If by any means I might attain unto the resurrection of the dead.”

Becoming dead to sins and living sacrificial lives for Christ are indicators of a genuine salvation experience.

Both becoming dead to sins and living sacrificial lives do not merit the inclusion in the resurrection of the dead (which is obtained by grace through faith in Christ). On the contrary, these strongly validate the Christians’ belief that they will be a part of this glorious resurrection.

 

 

 

PRACTICAL APPLICATION:

In our text for this morning, Paul presents to great truths that we find presented throughout God’s Word:

1. The receipt of Christ’s righteousness and the certainty of eternal life is not based upon human merit but faith in Christ which is a gracious gift from God.

Eph 2:8-9 – “For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: Not of works, lest any man should boast.”

2. The two distinguishing marks of a genuine salvation experience are being made dead to sin, and a willingness to live sacrificial lives for Christ…

Rom 6:10-14 – “For in that he died, he died unto sin once: but in that he liveth, he liveth unto God. Likewise reckon ye also yourselves to be dead indeed unto sin, but alive unto God through Jesus Christ our Lord. Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal body, that ye should obey it in the lusts thereof. Neither yield ye your members as instruments of unrighteousness unto sin: but yield yourselves unto God, as those that are alive from the dead, and your members as instruments of righteousness unto God. For sin shall not have dominion over you: for ye are not under the law, but under grace.”

May the Lord help us to always remember these two great truths and allow them to cultivate a greater love, appreciation and assurance of the wonderful salvation He has so graciously given to us!

Questions, Comments, or Suggestions?

Email me at: rob.barkman@settledinheaven.org

Homepage… http://www.settledinheaven.org

Text Blog… http://www.settledinheaven.wordpress.com

Video Blog… http://www.youtube.com/settledinheaven